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Fake news

Despite media criticism about the proliferation of 'fake news', some marketers see nothing wrong with using it to score flashy results for clients

SearchLeeds always brings a raft of quality talks from British agencies offering their opinions on hot-button issues and advice on alternative approaches you can try out for everything from SEO to PPC, CRO, and other triple-initialled areas of digital marketing. However, one talk caught my eye for the wrong reasons. Oliver Brett from Screaming Frog delivered a talk titled ‘How to make fake news for links’, the description of which asks: “Tired of infographics? Got a bunch of clients nobody’s ever heard of? Got no budget, but need top-level links? Why not orchestrate your own hilarious viral news stories for great exposure?” [si_guide_block id="85104" title="Download our Free Resource – Top 10 common content marketing mistakes" description="Our free content marketing mistakes guide…

Consumers don't trust influencers, Facebook launches 3 new ad tools for small businesses, Amazon storing UK biometric data, Facebook relaxes cryptocurrency ad rules, Google's new consumer privacy plans, Facebook removes "dangerous users", digital ad revenues top $1bn, Facebook political ad warning and Singapore passes 'fake news' law.

This week has seen a number of big digital and marketing stories in the headlines. We've taken a look at some of the biggest, including new findings that show only 4% trust information shared by celebrity influencers, bloggers and vloggers. On top of this, Facebook has announced three new advertising tools that are aimed at helping small businesses make the most of the platform. There are also concerns being raised about a new Home Office contract that could see Amazon storing biometric information belonging to millions of people in the UK. Other Facebook news reveals that the platform is loosening its rules on advertising related to cryptocurrencies…

Singapore proposes a new law to stop fake news, Mark Zuckerberg calls on government internet regulation, Amazon stops aggressively marketing its own brands and the ASA uses tracking technology to assess ads aimed at children

This week has seen Singapore suggest a new law that could ultimately fine tech giants for failing to stop the spread of fake news. If passed, companies could be fined up to SGD$1 million for breaking the regulations. While Singapore's suggest law has met with criticism, Mark Zuckerberg is calling for more regulation when it comes to the internet. The Facebook founder wants governments to be more involved with updating current rules in four key areas. Amazon has stopped aggressively marketing its own products following complaints, opting for a softer approach to showcasing its own brand items on its platform. Finally, the ASA has used tracking technology for the first time to see what ads are being served to…