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Unravel your customer journeys with Google Analytics clickstream analysis on forward and reverse paths

I don't know whether you have heard of the forward and reverse path clickstream analysis technique? It's a shame path analysis isn't so well known as say funnel analysis, since it's a strong analysis technique to help understand customer journeys on a site to identify inefficiencies. Clickstream analysis can be used to review the quality and value of your REACH marketing activities, as well as informing crucial decision-making in the ACT and CONVERT stage of your customer conversion strategy. [si_monthly_campaign_blog_cta_banner id=156432]

What is clickstream analysis?

Clickstream analysis is the strategic analytical activity of reviewing the order of URLs visited and the actions taken during your customers' journeys on your site. By analyzing their forward and reverse 'path' you can track patterns and trends in your conversion funnel, towards your goals. In Google Analytics, use the "Navigation Summary" for paths…

Learn how SMEs can use Porter’s 5 Forces to assess marketplace viability when planning

Right now, Porter's 5 Forces is the most useful tool for owners and managers to stay one step ahead of the competition in a challenging market. The Porter's 5 Forces model has always been popular with SMEs in particular, looking to invest for growth and manage risk to their limited resources. Earmarked as the best marketing model to help small businesses analyze the competition in the marketplace, balancing these 5 forces is a must for your 2021 marketing action plan.

What are Porter’s 5 Forces?

Porter’s 5 Forces is an analytical model that helps marketers and business managers look at the ‘balance of power’ in a market between different organizations on a global level, and to analyze the attractiveness and potential profitability of an industry sector. Competitive rivalry Threat of substitute products Bargaining power of buyers …

Marketers can use qualitative analytics to investigate the real reasons for falling conversion rates

The problem with the analytics methods we use today is that they show you WHAT is happening on your website/ in your app, but not WHY it’s happening. That’s where qualitative analytics comes in. In addition to data that show trends in user acquisition and retention, qualitative allows you to delve deeper into the “why” of your conversion rates, giving you a front-row seat to see how your users behave by showing you video recordings of real user sessions.

Why more marketers are turning to qualitative analytics

Qualitative analytics is an analytics method that records users’ actions on your site/ in your app, providing a deeper look at user experiences and behaviors. This means that in addition to graphs and numerical data such as MAU/DAU, new sessions, and purchases. The…

10 ways to segment website visitors using Google Analytics

When I work on E-commerce projects to identify methods to increase conversion, I always start with a structured analysis of the current effectiveness of customer journeys for different segments, using Google Analytics to help identify potential improvements to site page templates to test.

Segments are powerful since they help you isolate and compare different traffic sources, so in the screengrab below we have selected organic traffic to just find out how these visitors behave, for example, which landing pages do they arrive on?

Note that to encourage usage of Advanced Segments, Google renamed them a couple of years ago to 'Segments' in order to make them less scary and encourage adoption amongst GA users who don't see themselves as advanced. A key part of this approach is to go beyond the…

The massive volume of analytics data can confuse and point you in the wrong direction. Here’s how to understand what your website visitors are really doing...

Web analytics can be extremely useful, but it the data can also be a curse. Indeed, online we now live in a world swimming with data, so much so we have to call it “big data”. The problem with big data is it needs big analysis. The more analytics you collect, the more time it takes to wade through the reports and try to work out what is happening with your website. Google Analytics, for instance, has 103 standard reports you can look at. That’s before you start adding your own specific requirements and comparisons. In addition, there is a problem with all of these reports; none of them tell you “why” a visitor did what…