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Customer Loyalty programmes

With myriad options available to today’s consumer, customer retention is vital for e-commerce brands. Gamification, push notifications and loyal programs help in contently re-engaging with the existing customers

Research by Frederick Reichheld of Bain & Company found an increase of 5% in customer retention can improve the revenues by 25-95%. In e-commerce, repeat customers are godsends. They’ve proven their interest in buying your product and are willing to spend money. In fact, according to a report by RJ Metrics, an online store typically generates 43% of its revenue from existing users. This figure can increase up to 75% if the store spends time and effort cultivating a deeper relationship with its existing customers. [si_guide_block id="125181" title="Download our Premium Resource – E-commerce personalization buyer’s guide" description="Learn everything you need to about e-commerce personalization before taking the steps needed to start implementing it in your own company."/] The question that…

My wallet is full of loyalty cards, I've so many at the moment I'm using a spare wallet I got for Christmas just for loyalty cards. But am I the average customer? Do customers want, use and see value in loyalty schemes?

The loyalty market is in a state of flux, Sainsbury's have recently acquired Nectar from Aimia, whilst Tesco are planning to cut back on their reward partner offers. Not so long ago, Morrisons launched their More card to give them the edge over ASDA and compete better with Sainsbury's and Tesco. Loyalty schemes are expensive to implement, promote and very costly to manage. But are they making a difference? Do they increase sales and loyalty? I'm going to take a look at the market. A selection of loyalty cards  The popularity of loyalty cards started a few years back, in the form of…

Local tactics are the keys to consumer loyalty in a mobile-first world

For bricks-and-mortar businesses, loyalty programs have been a staple for decades, whether in the form of punch cards promising a free item, special sale offerings, or the now ubiquitous loyalty cards that we scan at grocery stores, pet stores, and everywhere in between. Simply put, customers think that loyalty programs are effective at getting them to return. It’s no surprise, then, that as ecommerce rose to prominence, many online businesses also instituted some variation of the loyalty program. A problem arises today, however, when businesses think that the only way to drive customer loyalty is through such programs. But what are the alternatives? Customers are increasingly burdened by a jumble of key rings, codes, and email subscriptions telling them about special offerings and it can be a little overwhelming. There has to be another way. One alternative to the traditional…

Selling to your existing customers is much easier than attracting new ones. So keep them coming back.

Do you want more returning customers? The kind of customers who spend more and visit more often? Then a loyalty program could be the perfect tool to add to your customer retention arsenal. Why? You may ask. Let’s start with the most reasonable fact: because it makes you more money. That is, of course, if you do it the right way. Here’s a quick stat that’s worth remembering: Keeping a current customer costs you 3-10 times less than acquiring a new one, depending on the industry you are in. According to WordStream, small businesses spend between $9,000 and $10,000 trying to attract new customers on Google paid search campaigns in just each month on average. Just image how much more efficient you could be if you could switch that re-activating existing customers and getting repeat…

Understanding the true value of customer loyalty programs

According to Colloquy, there are 3.3 billion loyalty program memberships in the United States alone. When you consider that the entire U.S. population is only 319 million, the amount of loyalty programs per person is staggering. The average member is enrolled in over 13 programs and 71% of those earning $100K+ use loyalty programs. 76% of shoppers think that loyalty programs are a part of their relationship with brands. But most businesses focus their programs on discounts. You can’t substitute discounts for brand loyalty. There is an emotional aspect to shopper behavior that brands can’t ignore. 97% of loyalty programs are transaction-based, where customers receive discounts for purchases. While this is a foundational aspect of a rewards program, most businesses don’t go beyond that. Only 25% of them reward customers for some type of engagement. If you make your customer experience…